Drivers in Springfield can expect snow to slow their travel on streets and highways throughout the day Friday, but the original forecast for snowfall has been downgraded to about an inch.

At 6:15 a.m., the Missouri Department of Transportation Traveler Information Map, an online tool that shows how weather affects roads, showed most of Springfield’s key streets were at least partially covered with light snow.

A general rule of thumb was that the snow affected streets more in northern and western Springfield. Interstate 44, U.S. Highway 160 toward Willard,  U.S. Highway 160 from Republic, U.S. Highway 65 from Fair Grove and state routes EE and H all were “partly covered” with snow, according to MoDOT.

The James River Freeway was mostly clear, as was U.S. Highway 65 south of Kearney Street, but MoDOT still advises drivers to use caution when traveling throughout the day. Traffic camera views at OzarksTraffic.com showed drivers taking precautions, but generally moving along through the early portion of the morning commute. 

Chances of snow in Springfield are expected to fade off by noon, with temperatures hanging just under the freezing mark and winds holding steady from the north-northwest at 12-14 miles per hour. The wind will make it feel like it’s 20 degrees outside.

Snow accumulations were initially forecast at up to three inches, but according to the National Weather Service, accumulations in Springfield are now expected to top out at about an inch. The highest accumulations are expected in northwest Springfield and in the areas to the north and west of the city.

“A high March sun angle will make it more difficult for accumulations from late morning into the afternoon hours. The highest snow totals are expected northwest of Interstate 44,” part of the National Weather Service forecast discussion for Friday reads.

As skies clear on Friday night, temperatures are expected to drop into the teens or even into the single digits, allowing for wind chill values to drop near zero and creating potentially dangerous conditions for persons who are outside for long periods of time.

Rance Burger

Rance Burger covers local government for the Daily Citizen. His goal is to help people know more about what projects their government is involved in, and how their tax dollars are being spent. He is a graduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia with 15 years experience in journalism. Reach him at rburger@sgfcitizen.org or by calling 417-837-3669. Twitter: @RanceBurger More by Rance Burger